How Can I Heal Thee? Let Me Count The Ways, Part 3

August 12, 2020; This article by Dr Thomas Levy is really an expose’ and indictment (and they should be indicted) of governmental agencies and drug manufacturers working in collusion to generate massive profits for mainstream medicine. Most people have forgotten that God created Mankind from the dust/minerals of the Earth, not from the drugs of a laboratory. Although there is a time and place for drugs in emergency situations, true healing takes place by replenishment of those components that make up our bodies.

This notice is for any corporate/legal fiction governmental agency and their non-legal fiction employees seeking either intentionally or in ignorance to violate Constitution Protections. (Ref: U.S.C. Title 42 (1983) & https://www.uscfc.uscourts.gov/; https://www.uscfc.uscourts.gov/sites/default/files/Complaint%20Fillable%20Form_2.pdf)

Declaration of Independence (The Sole Mandate of American Government):
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.–That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men,

Amendment One (No Commercial Limitation on the Freedom of Speech):
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridgng the freedom of speech, or of the press;…

Commentary by Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD (OMNS) Part 1: (OMNS) Probably never before in history has anything or any event mixed fact, fiction, fear, and confusion like the COVID-19 [fake] pandemic of 2019-2020. Political and medical “experts” have been in abundance, primarily regurgitating the same message as though it was something new every time they get interviewed: wash your hands, maintain social distancing, and wear a mask as much as possible. And the public and the news media always take great comfort that an “expert” told them the truth. Trouble is, you can always find another “expert” of equal credentials who will offer a completely contradictory perspective. Understandably, this generates much of the fear and confusion noted above.

Convalescent Plasma (improves, may cure)

Convalescent plasma is plasma collected from individuals who have recovered from an infectious disease resulting in the formation of antibodies. Depending on the severity of COVID-19 infection and the inherent immune capacity in a given patient, the transfusion of convalescent plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients has nearly always significantly reduced the viral load and clinically improved the patient. When the viral load is lowered dramatically, a clinical cure can be expected. A significantly improved survival rate has been seen in COVID-19 patients who have received convalescent plasma therapy. [32,33]

Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine (prevents, improves, cures)

I have had the opportunity to see clear-cut and dramatically positive clinical responses in six individuals with rapidly evolving symptoms consistent with fulminant COVID-19 infection treated with oral chloroquine phosphate. In these individuals (ranging from 35 to 65 years of age), therapy was initiated when breathing was very already very difficult and continuing to worsen. In all six, significant improvement in breathing was seen within about four hours after the first dose, with a complete clinical recovery seen after about an average of three days. The oldest individual had a pulse oximeter reading of 80 before the first dose of chloroquine, and the reading improved to 94 after about four hours as the labored breathing eased. The rapidity with which the shortness of breath evolved in all these individuals strongly suggested that respiratory failure secondary to COVID-19-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome was imminent. The chloroquine dosing was continued for several days after complete clinical resolution to prevent any possible clinical relapse. While a large, definitive study on chloroquine and COVID-19 remains to be completed, there is already a great deal of published evidence supporting its effectiveness and overall safety. [34,35] Also, a recent clinical trial demonstrated that hydroxychloroquine given with azithromycin eradicated or significantly decreased measured viral load in respiratory swabs. [36]

Both chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine are old drugs that are very safe at the doses shown to be effective in treating COVID-19, and they are both recognized as having significant nonspecific antiviral properties. Also, chloroquine, and probably hydroxychloroquine as well, are zinc ionophores, [37,38] which is likely the reason why they have such significant antiviral properties. As noted above in the discussion on zinc, agents that greatly facilitate zinc transport inside virus-infected cells rapidly accelerate virus destruction and clinical resolution of the viral infection. Many clinicians now feel that chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine therapy for COVID-19 and other viruses is optimized by concomitant zinc administration. [39,40] Certainly, there is no good reason to avoid taking zinc with these agents.

As might be expected, drugs as potently antiviral to COVID-19 as chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine would be expected to be effective preventive agents as well, particularly in the setting where exposure is known or strongly suspected to have taken place, or in a setting where repeated and substantial exposure will reliably occur, as in COVID-19-treating hospitals. [41,42] Many front-line health care workers are on such preventive protocols. But many of the physicians who are taking one of these agents to prevent COVID-19 infection are still resistant to giving it to infected patients. This is difficult to logically reconcile if patient welfare is of the uppermost concern.

Radiotherapy (improves, cures)

In a recent pilot trial at Emory University, five nursing home patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were given a single treatment of low-dose radiotherapy over the lungs. All five patients had radiographic evidence of pneumonia and required supplemental oxygen. All five were felt to be deteriorating from a clinical perspective. The radiotherapy consisted of a 10- to 15-minute application of 1.5 Gy (150 rads). Four of the five patients were noted to have a rapid improvement in their breathing, and clinical recovery was seen to occur between 3 and 96 hours post-irradiation.

General Recommendations

While many supplement regimens can be used for COVID-19 prevention, such regimens should include at a minimum vitamin C, vitamin D, magnesium chloride, and zinc. Any of many additional quality nutrient and antioxidant supplements can be added as desired, largely dependent on expense and personal preference.

Nebulizations of powerful antipathogen agents, especially hydrogen peroxide, can readily prevent respiratory viral infections like COVID-19 from taking hold, and initiating such nebulizations even after an infection has been contracted will still make a substantial contribution to a more rapid and complete recovery.

As noted earlier, interventions such as ozone and ultraviolet blood treatments have the potential to be effective monotherapies, although it is always a good idea to accompany such treatments with the baseline supplementation regimen and nebulizations as mentioned above.

In the hospitalized setting, intravenous vitamin C and dexamethasone should always be part of the treatment regimen. Nebulizations with hydrogen peroxide and budesonide can accelerate recovery substantially. Also, patients already on ventilator support should always be given vitamin C and dexamethasone along with these nebulizations in addition to anything else felt to be indicated by the attending physician.

Low doses of hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine along with zinc should always be given in the setting of high-risk exposure. Azithromycin can be taken with these agents as well. Higher doses of these agents should always be part of any regimen in the treatment of a suspected or diagnosed COVID-19 patient, whether asymptomatic or already in the hospital.

Recap

While the politics of the COVID-19 pandemic are beyond the scope and aim of this article, there remain no valid medical reasons for not using any of the agents or interventions itemized above for either preventing or treating COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, many combinations of these treatments can be applied, depending on their availability and the clinical status of a given patient. Traditional medicine insists on “proof” of any therapy before it is used routinely, even though this standard of proof is never actually obtained for many of the usual prescription drug approaches to infections and other diseases. When an agent is inexpensive, virtually harmless, and with substantial evidence of providing benefit, there is no justification for a physician to refuse or even actively block its administration to a patient otherwise assured of prolonged suffering and likely death (as with hospitalized COVID-19 patients on ventilation support).

With the treatment options available, there is no good reason for most people to even contract COVID-19, and there is certainly no good reason for anyone to die from this virus, much less have a prolonged clinical course of infection with a great deal of needless suffering.

Please note: None of the information in this article is intended to be utilized by anyone as direct medical advice. Rather, the article is intended only to make the reader aware of other treatment possibilities and documented scientific information that can be further discussed with a chosen health care professional.

(Cardiologist and attorney Thomas E. Levy is the author of a number of books, including Curing the Incurable: Vitamin C, Infectious Diseases, and Toxins; Primal Panacea; and Stop America’s #1 Killer. His email is televymd@yahoo.com).

References

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The views expressed in this article are the author’s and not necessarily those of the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service or all members of its Editorial Board. OMNS invites alternative viewpoints. Submissions may be sent directly to Andrew W. Saul, Editor, at the email contact address below.

Nutritional Medicine is Orthomolecular Medicine

Orthomolecular medicine uses safe, effective nutritional therapy to fight illness. For more information: http://www.orthomolecular.org

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Damien Downing, M.B.B.S., M.R.S.B. (United Kingdom)
Martin P. Gallagher, M.D., D.C. (USA)
Michael J. Gonzalez, N.M.D., D.Sc., Ph.D. (Puerto Rico)
William B. Grant, Ph.D. (USA)
Tonya S. Heyman, M.D. (USA)
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Bo H. Jonsson, M.D., Ph.D. (Sweden)
Jeffrey J. Kotulski, D.O. (USA)
Peter H. Lauda, M.D. (Austria)
Thomas Levy, M.D., J.D. (USA)
Alan Lien, Ph.D. (Taiwan)
Homer Lim, M.D. (Philippines)
Stuart Lindsey, Pharm.D. (USA)
Victor A. Marcial-Vega, M.D. (Puerto Rico)
Charles C. Mary, Jr., M.D. (USA)
Mignonne Mary, M.D. (USA)
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Selvam Rengasamy, MBBS, FRCOG (Malaysia)
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Garry Vickar, M.D. (USA)
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